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1905: Luverne's July Fourth celebration 'was a grand success'

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on July 7, 1905.
Was a Grand Success
Such Was Luverne’s Celebration of the Glorious Fourth
6000 People Were in Attendance
Notwithstanding Preceding Unfavorable Weather Conditions, Luverne Observes Our Nation’s Birthday With a Notable Successful Celebration—Occasion Graced by Presence of Governor John A. Johnson Who Delivers Inspiring Address—Splendid Program Carried Out to the Satisfaction of All
This article is continued from last week.
The Picnic Dinner
The picnic dinner which followed immediately after the exercises was one of the most enjoyable events of the day to those who were so fortunate as to be able to take their lunches under the beautiful shade trees of the school and court house grounds. The school house grounds were filled with merry picnicking parties and many who were unable to find room there went across the street to the court house grounds, which were equally well shaded and adapted to the purpose, the only drawback being that the latter grounds were more remote from the free lemonade stand. Some idea of the number of people who availed themselves of the opportunity to take their dinners on the grounds may be gained from the fact more than five barrels of lemonade were dispensed.
Vaudeville Show
The program for the afternoon events opened at 1 o’clock with the vaudeville show at the pavilion on the school grounds, with a large crowd in attendance. The show consisted of monologues, comic songs, bag punching, etc. The bag punching exhibition was given by Harry Burns, who holds the American championship in this art.
Ball Game
The next events on the program were the ball game between Luverne and Hills at the improvised grounds in Parriott’s addition on North Freeman avenue, and the ring ride on Main street, both of which started at the same hour and both drawing large crowds. Owing to the short time intervening after it was found necessary to abandon the Driving park grounds it was impossible to erect a grand stand or seats at the new ball grounds. Nevertheless the consequent unavoidable inconveniences did not apparently deter many who wished to see the game from attending, for fully fifteen hundred people were in attendance and the crowd was dispersed in such a way that all were able to witness the game with comfort. Hills was first at bat and made one score in the first inning, while Luverne drew a goose egg in her half. Both sides drew blanks in the second inning and Hills continued the circle score feature in her half of the third. In her half of the third inning Luverne connected with the horse hide often enough to bring in one score and tie the game. Hills again drew a goose egg in her half of the fourth inning, but Luverne had gotten a taste of the elusive little sphere and wanted more, and, of course, got it, landing on the ball with an earnestness and frequency that allowed three men ample time to amble across home plate. The score was then 4 to 1 in favor of Luverne and remained unchanged at the end of the sixth inning. In the first half of the seventh inning with two men out and one man on first base, Feay, of Rock Rapids, who was playing first base for Hills, drove a two-bagger into the left field, sending it over the line of carriages and spectators, and before the fielder got the ball both men crossed the home plate. This ended the game. Umpire Amos Scott called the ball foul. The Hills players immediately swarmed around the umpire and a rag-chewing match succeeded the National game. Feay became abusive, called the umpire an odious name and promptly received a well directed jolt under the right ear. The Hills players then walked off the diamond and refused to play. Later they agreed to finish the game if they could have a new umpire, but as they had deferred this decision until the ten minutes had expired allowed by the rules in which a team shall play after having once left the field, the Luverne players refused to continue the game except on the basis on which it was begun. Hills refused to accede to this condition and the game was declared forfeited to Luverne by the score of 9 to 0. The incident was most unfortunate and was deeply deplored by all. As to the correctness of Umpire Scott’s decision there appears to be a wide difference of opinion. Many who were in position to see declare that the ball in dispute was foul, while perhaps an equal number who were in equally as good position to judge declare that it was fair. The word of J. S. Joles, who found the ball and placed his foot upon it pending the umpire’s decision, is undoubtedly correct and should be authoritative, and Mr. Joles’ statement is that the ball was fully ten feet outside the lines. But regardless of this point, the fact remains that the Hills players should have abided by the umpire’s decision. Another point is that if the ball had been declared “fair” neither of the scores run in under it would have counted. The ball was what is termed a “blocked ball” and a player is not entitled to more than two bases on a ball of that character, while as it was one man ran from first base and the striker from the home plate. Several ifs naturally arise but the most important one is that “if” the Hills nine had been playing their own team instead of a pick-up team from the various surrounding towns, the trouble most likely would not have occurred.
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: July 4th Continues

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on July 7, 1905.
Was a Grand Success
Such Was Luverne’s Celebration of the Glorious Fourth
6000 People Were in Attendance
Notwithstanding Preceding Unfavorable Weather Conditions, Luverne Observes Our Nation’s Birthday With a Notable Successful Celebration—Occasion Graced by Presence of Governor John A. Johnson Who Delivers Inspiring Address—Splendid Program Carried Out to the Satisfaction of All
This article is continued from last week.
The Exercises—Governor Johnson’s Address
Promptly at 10:30 o’clock, under the direction of Jay A. Kennicott, president of the day, the exercises were opened with the singing of “America” by the quartette and the audience, accompanied by the fourth Regiment band, which was followed by the invocation by Rev. A. H. Carver, and a musical selection, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” by the Ladies’ quartette composed of the Misses Matilda Skyberg, Alice Olds, Eda Graaf, and Mrs. S. C. Rea, with Mrs. Harrison White as accompanist. Acting Mayor C. O. Wright delivered a short and pleasing address of welcome in behalf of the citizens of Luverne, N. R. Reynolds, Esq., read the Declaration of Independence with pleasing effect, and after a solo, “Barbara Freitche,” by Mrs. Edith Carpenter Klock, with Mrs. Jay A. Kennicott as accompanist, Gov. John A. Johnson, the speaker of the day, was introduced. This was the crowning event of the day, and as our splendid young chief executive  stepped to the front of the platform under the overhanging flags, tall, erect, resolute his handsome  face lighted by that genial nature and love of his fellows which has won for him the affection of all who know him, yet dignified by the consciousness of his position and the grave responsibilities  of his great office, he was greeted by the large audience with an enthusiasm which had in it all the depths of pride in our chief executive, honor for his office, and sincere respect, admiration and affection for the man who has so conspicuously honored his exalted position and justified the trust reposed in him. Here, as everywhere, John A. Johnson was equal to the occasion. Like all his oratorical efforts his address was brilliant and inspiring. His clear, resonant voice carried every syllable to the remotest listener and from the first earnest word to the thrilling peroration he held the fixed and delighted attention of the audience. In the main it was a speech of the Roosevelt type—earnest, impressive and patriotic, with a deep and sincere purpose—an appeal for character, patriotism, manliness, for the sturdy virtues that transcend partisanship and find expression in good citizenship, for sane, decent, simple, earnest living, for education of the kind that makes sound manhood and womanhood, for love of justice and righteousness, and for practical and effective devotion to a high sense of public and private duty. “I want good government and I care not from whom or what party it comes” was the key note of the governor’s appeal to the broader and higher patriotism that rises above party and partisanship, and the sentiment was most heartily applauded. But the governor did not forget that people like to be amused as well as instructed and his genial good nature and wit broke out occasionally in appeals to mirth that relieved the tension of earnest thinking. On the whole it was a magnificent address and the enthusiastic approval, delight and approbation with which it was received found expression in ways that could not be misunderstood. At the close of the exercises and as the governor passed from the platform to his carriage he was fairly besieged by the people who desired to meet him and to give expression to their good will and admiration. As a matter of fact no governor or other distinguished official who has ever visited Luverne was ever greeted with such manifest respect and sincere affection as was shown toward Governor Johnson at the conclusion of his address. Unfortunately the governor was obliged to leave for his home in St. Peter on the 12:20 train and for this reason was compelled to forego for himself and deny to the public the pleasure he would have had in meeting more of the people who desired to greet him personally. For the pleasure his visit gave us and the distinguished honor accorded to Luverne by his presence on this occasion, Gov. Johnson will always have the sincerest and deepest gratitude of all our people.
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: The Fourth of July celebration continues

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on July 7, 1905.
Was a Grand Success
Such Was Luverne’s Celebration of the Glorious Fourth
6000 People Were in Attendance
Notwithstanding Preceding Unfavorable Weather Conditions, Luverne Observes Our Nation’s Birthday With a Notable Successful Celebration—Occasion Graced by Presence of Governor John A. Johnson Who Delivers Inspiring Address—Splendid Program Carried Out to the Satisfaction of All
This article is continued from last week.
Large Crowd in Attendance
Expectations of a large crowd were not very bright even with the dawn of a beautiful day. The heavy rains had washed out many culverts in every direction and had made the roads seemingly impassable. Doubtless the belief was generally entertained that the celebration would be abandoned. But the patriotism of our people—the spirit which makes July the Fourth the grandest and most glorious day of the year in any country in the world—was equal to the occasion. It was our Nation’s birthday and that nothing short of a deluge on the day itself would keep the people from celebrating it was well apparent by noon. At 8 o’clock in the morning the Bonnie Doon train brought five coaches packed with citizens from Doon, Rock Rapids and Ashcreek; other trains added their quota in generous measure, while from every roadway carriages brought hundreds of people from the surrounding country, many of them driving miles out of the regular road to avoid washouts, until at noon it was estimated that there were fully six thousand people present.
Greeting to Gov. Johnson
Gov. Johnson A. Johnson arrived from St. Paul at 5 o’clock in the morning and was escorted to The Manitou where he made his headquarters during his stay. Luverne greeted him in gala attire, for on the day previous the people of Luverne had made up their minds to celebrate in spite of the rain and between downpours during the afternoon had put up the elaborate decorations planned, which being of “fast” colors did not lose their beauty by the drenching received. Private decorations by the business men and others were added at an early hour and by 9:30 not only Main street but many residences were gaily bedecked in the holiday attire of bunting and flags.
The Parade
The program of exercises for the day was opened by the parade which formed at the corner of Main street and Freeman avenue. This feature was the only one of the many arranged by the committee which suffered seriously by the rain. The muddy streets made it impossible for many to participate who had planned to do so, and accordingly the parade was robbed of many of its best features. The parade was headed by the South Dakota Fourth Regiment band followed by the carriage containing Gov. Johnson, carriages containing the city officers, the ladies who participated in the musical program at the patriotic exercises, the callithumpians, headed by the callithumpian band, and a long line of citizens in carriages. The course of the parade was from Freeman avenue down Main street to Spring street, thence north to Lincoln street, thence west to McKenzie street, thence south to Main street where it continued to the starting point, thence north two blocks to Luverne street grounds where the patriotic exercises were held.
Callithumpian Prize Winners
The callithumpian feature of the parade was excellent and entitles the participants to much credit for the originality and successful execution of their ideas. Nine prizes were awarded as follows: First prize, $10, to a group of Pickaninnies dancing on a platform erected on a wagon; second prize $7, to the Callithumpian (Luverne) band; third prize, $5, to Fred Crawford and Ed. Thompson, Pygmy Hose Co., fourth prize, $2.50, to A. E. Wyse, poultry merchant; fifth prize, $1, to Frank Fritz, dressed as a giant; sixth prize, $1, to Corse Horne and Barton Chapin; the seventh, eighth and ninth prizes of $1 each were awarded to the following outfits, the owners of which are unknown: Foreigner with carpet bag, two with white horse and grass in cart, and Zouave.
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: Weather breaks for splendid July 4

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on July 7, 1905.
Was a Grand Success
Such Was Luverne’s Celebration of the Glorious Fourth
6000 People Were in Attendance
Notwithstanding Preceding Unfavorable Weather Conditions, Luverne Observes Our Nation’s Birthday With a Notable Successful Celebration—Occasion Graced by Presence of Governor John A. Johnson Who Delivers Inspiring Address—Splendid Program Carried Out to the Satisfaction of All
Despite a week of almost continuous rain which fell with unknown persistency up to the very dawn of the Fourth, Luverne celebrated our Nation’s birthday, carried out the elaborate plans that had been arranged and made the day one long to be remembered by the thousands of people whose faith in Luverne’s ability to provide entertainment notwithstanding unfavorable conditions led them to become our guests on this glorious occasion.
Happy Change in Gloomy Prospect
The closing preliminary arrangements for the celebration were made by those in charge with a marked depression of spirit. The heavy rains which had fallen practically every day of the preceding week and during the early part of Monday night seriously threatened the success of celebration and aroused grave doubts that any part of the splendid program prepared could be given. But the breeze which sprang up from the northwest Monday afternoon cleared the skies late in the night and Tuesday morning gave assurance that the rain was over and that the celebration could go forward.
Changes in Plans Required
But the change in the weather had been too long deferred to make it possible to carry out the program without changes in the original plans. Monday morning it became apparent that under the most favorable weather conditions that could afterwards prevail it would be impossible to hold the patriotic exercises, the picnic dinner and the vaudeville show in the park, as the heavy rains had so swollen the river that the park was almost inundated. The river continued to rise rapidly and by night Monday it was found necessary to also abandon the Driving park for the purposes of the ball game as the river overflowed the roads making it impossible to reach the grounds. Accordingly a pavilion with seats under the trees was erected at the Central school grounds for the patriotic exercises and the vaudeville show, arrangements were made for those who wished to have their picnic dinners on the school and court house grounds, and a ball ground was laid out in a grass plot in the Parriott addition.
 
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: Rural Route 4 begins at Luverne Post Office

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on April 28, 1905.
New Rural Route
Fourth To Be Fed From Luverne Postoffice
To Begin Operation June 1
Recent Petition to Department at Washington for Establishment of R. F. D. R. No. 4, to Extend South from the city is Granted—Route Covers Area of Twenty-Eight Square Miles and Will Serve Population of 480
Postmaster M. Swedberg received notice Saturday from the Postoffice Department at Washington that the application for a rural free delivery route made several weeks ago by a number of the residents of Luverne, Clinton and Magnolia townships had been granted and that the route would be started June 1. Gilbert Gutterson, special agent of the department, was here a few weeks ago and inspected the route proposed by the petitioners and as it met with the requirements of the department gave it his approval. The route will be known as Luverne Rural Free Delivery Route No. 4. It is twenty-eight miles long and serves ninety-four houses and four hundred and seventy people. The course of the route is as follows:
Beginning at the post office and running southwest to the center of the east line of section 10, (the south end of Kniss avenue); thence south three miles to the center of the east line of section 27; thence west one mile; thence south two and one-half miles to the northeast corner of section 9, Clinton township; thence east one and one-half miles to the center of the south line of section 2; thence north one mile; thence east one mile to the center of the south line of section 36, Luverne township; thence north one and one-half miles to the center of section 25; thence east one-half mile and south one-half mile to the northwest corner of section 31, Magnolia township; thence east one mile and south one mile to the northwest corner of section 5, Kanaranzi township; thence east two miles; thence north three miles to the northeast corner of section 21, Magnolia township; thence west two miles and south one mile to the northwest corner of section 29; thence west two miles to the northwest corner of section 25, Luverne township; thence north two miles to the southeast corner of section 11, (known as Jaycox’ corner,) and thence along the irregular road passing through the park to the post office.
The examination for carriers for this route have not yet been held, but they will be in ample time to secure the appointment of the carrier by June 1, the date set for the beginning of delivery.
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: New auto livery set to open in Luverne

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on March 10, 1905.
Open Automobile Livery
New Project by Hulett Bros
Up-to-Date Livery Establishment for Luverne Will be Installed this Month—Luverne Automobile Company’s Machines to be Used
Hulett Brothers are now completing arrangements to open an automobile livery in this city some time during the present month. They have purchased one of the Luverne Automobile company’s large machines to start with and if their business warrants it will add as many more of this make as necessary, using both runabouts and surreys. The machine they have purchased is one of the late models built by the Luverne company. It is of 16-horse power, with double cylinder engine and is a very powerful machine. The establishment of a livery of this kind fills a long felt apparent want. Since the Luverne Automobile company first began making machines they have received almost daily requests from traveling men and others for machines to be used in trips to other towns, as well as for pleasure trips, but as this was entirely out of their line they were unable to meet the demand. Messrs. Hulett are well qualified to conduct an establishment of this character, and as the Luverne machines have proved to be without an equal in medium priced autos, the success of their proposed enterprise is already well assured.
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: Train brings pure seed specialist to Luverne

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on March 10, 1905.
 
Pure Seed Train
Special Scheduled to Run on Omaha Road
Will be at Luverne Mar. 16
Prof. Bull of State Agricultural School Will Deliver Lecture on “Seed Selection and Improved Methods” in Luverne on Thursday, March 16—Every farmer in Rock County Should Make a Special Effort to be Present
Mayor E. A. Brown received notice this week from the Tri-State Grain Dealers” association that a “pure seed special train,” which will run over the Omaha line, will stop at this place on Thursday, March 16, for the purpose of giving Prof. C. P. Bull of the State Agricultural college an opportunity to give a lecture to the farmers of Rock county on the subject of “Seed Selection and Improved Methods.” The train will arrive at 10:50 a.m. and Prof. Bull will lecture for forty-five minutes.
The “pure seed specials” are run gratuitously throughout all sections of this state and North and South Dakota by the various railroad companies doing business in the different sections for the purpose of giving the farmers reliable information as to the choice of seeds. This work receives the endorsement of the facility of the State Agricultural school and the railroads are assisted by the State to the extent that competent lectures from the State schools are sent out to discuss the matter of proper seed.
The fact that the question of whether or not the farmers plant seeds calculated to produce the best possible yields is of sufficient importance to the railroads to warrant their going to the big expense of sending special trains throughout the country to convey speakers to lecture on the see question, is sufficient evidence of the great importance the matter must be to the farmers. If the matter of additional freight tonnage warrants the railroads in going to this expense, the importance to the farmers should certainly be great enough to induce them to attend the lectures.
The farmers of Rock county should bear this in mind and make every effort to be in Luverne at the time above stated and hear Prof. Bull’s lecture. The place of holding the lecture has not yet been determined, but it will probably be either in the Opera house or in the court room. The lecture will be practical in every respect, and is given for the sole purpose of aiding the farmers in the selection of seeds and to give information in regard to improved methods recommended by the Agricultural schools.
Let every farmer in Rock county turn out and hear the lecture. There will be no charge for admission, nor will there be seeds of any description offered for sale.
Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: The parties continue

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on February 3, 1905.
 
In Social Circles
Record of a Typical Mid-Winter Week
Serial Life In Luverne Characterized by One Continuous Round of Pleasure—Dancing, Card, Dinner, Birthday Parties, Etc.—Wedding next Wednesday
 
This is continued from last week’s publication
***
The most enjoyable event of last season was the first party given by the “Has Been” club. In view of this fact the sending out of the subjoined invitations has aroused keen interest among those fortunate enough to receive them. The invitations, which, by the way, have been sent to married people only, are printed on wall paper and read as follows:
         Ure hereby notified that the Has Been Overhawl Klub are agoing fur to have another one of those popular meetins, same as the ones you was, or ought to have ben to last year. This meetin is agoin to be held at Onion hall, Friday, February 10th, 1905. The same rules and regulashuns will govern as were in force at former meetins, and iny person bringin more’n one wife will have to stay in the auntie room. There won’t be no tickets to this meetin, so bring you notice with you, as you kant get in without it Kissin or flurtin is prohibited, and iny person wearin store close will have to go without supper and help wait on table. The committee believe in womin sufferage and every other dance will be ladies’ choice. Susies baud will furnish musick and Proffessor Waxinheimer will render vocal selections durin the evenin. Ure xpected to bring a basket filled with sumthin to eat and don’t ferget tew koffey kups. Now this is all fur fon and if bizness interfers with this meetin, cut out, the bizness, for if we dident want you, we woodent have asked you to kum.
***
         Mr. and Mrs. John Ulrich and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Ulrich were hosts and hostesses Wednesday evening at a delightful card party given at the home of the former to the heads of the firm and the clerks in the different departments of Nelson Brothers’ store. Twenty-four guests were present.
***
         The Hydrophobia club gave a banquet Wednesday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Wittenberg in honor of Mr. John M. Connell and Dr. F. W. Winter.
***
         Jay Sanders and Francis Kelley entertained a number of their young friends at a card party Saturday evening at the home of the former’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Sanders.
***
         Dr. and Mrs. C. A. Palmer were host and hostess last evening at a pretty little dinner party given to a number of their neighbors at their home on West Main street. Twelve people gathered at the table, which was prettily decorated.
***
         Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Nelson entertained a few of their friends Friday evening at an informal card party.
***
         Two events are scheduled for rounding out the social record of the week—one tonight and one tomorrow night. This evening the Luverne Social club will hold one of their enjoyable dancing parties in Union hall. This is the club’s fourth dance of the present season. Tomorrow night Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Furlow will entertain the members of the “Muskrat Club” and their wives at diner at their home on Lincoln and Estey streets.
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: Records set in number of social circles

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on February 3, 1905.
 
In Social Circles
Record of a Typical Mid-Winter Week
Serial Life In Luverne Characterized by One Continuous Round of Pleasure—Dancing, Card, Dinner, Birthday Parties, Etc.—Wedding next Wednesday
This is continued from last week’s publication
         Miss Elsie Johnston proved herself a charming hostess Monday evening when she entertained the members of the Thursday Night club with a dinner party at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. D.  LaDue on North Estey street. The affair was undoubtedly the most enjoyable in the history of the club. Dinner was served at 7 o’clock in five courses, covers being laid for twenty people. All of the guests were seated about one large table, which was decorated with carnations. The special souvenirs of the dinner were crimson hearts, some of which were appropriately pierced by cupid’s arrow. Later in the evening the guests devoted their attention to playing progressive Five Hundred. John M. Connell and Arthur M. Marsh tied for the honors, with Mr. Connell winning the tie.
***
         Under ordinary circumstances a birthday club entertainment which occurred on the 21st ult. would be rather late for notice at this time, but inasmuch as the birthday of the guest of honor comes but one a year and the Kaeffee Klasche club meets only once a month, the Herald wishes to correct its oversight of last week. On the above date Mrs. C. O. Wright entertained the aforesaid club at her home on West Main street in honor of Mrs. A. E. Spalding.
***
         Two social events, both in club circles, were held Tuesday evening, when the Neighborhood club was entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ferguson at their home on West Main street, and the Ladies’ Tourist club by Mrs. A. D. LaDue at her home on North Estey street. A large number of the members of the Neighborhood club were present and participated in progressive Five Hundred, and at the conclusion of the games dainty refreshments were served by the hostess. The meeting of the Tourist club was one of their regular events and the usual program, in which pleasure is combined with study, was carried out.
***
         Mr. and Mrs. Geo. C. Huntington and Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Young united Saturday evening in entertaining the Freeman Avenue club at the home of the former. Four tables were set for progressive Five Hundred. Refresh-ments were served.
***
         Vying with other social entertainments Wednesday evening was the meeting of the Cinch club which was entertained by Mr. and Mrs. J. A Kennicott.
***
         The chief event of the week in social circles for those concerned was the dinner party given Sunday afternoon by Mr. and Mrs. Will McDermott at their commodious farm home at the Mounds. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Ryan, Mrs. Kate Brazzell, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. P. R. Kelley, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Beek, Mr. and Mrs. Harper Shaeffer.
***
         Elmer Cunningham, of Beaver Creek, who is attending the High school in this city, entertained twelve of his boy friends at a card party Saturday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Davis on West Warren street.
***
         The marriage of Miss Laura Elizabeth Hinky to Mr. John Mitchell Connell, which is announced for next Wednesday will be not only the most important evening of the coming week but will also be the social event of the season. Invitations for the wedding were issued by the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Hinkly, last week. Archbishop W. H. Knowlton, of St. James, will perform the ceremony which will take place in Holy Trinity church at 11 o’clock in the forenoon. From 11:30 until 2 o’clock a reception will be given at the bride’s home, and the bride and groom will leave at 3 o’clock on a trip to Chicago and other eastern points.
***
         In addition to the events of Tuesday evening noted above, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fritz entertained a number of their friends and neighbors very pleasantly with a card party at their home on West Warren street.                
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.

1905: Parties reach peak levels in Luverne

The following appeared in The Rock County Herald on February 3, 1905.
 
In Social Circles
Record of a Typical Mid-Winter Week
Serial Life In Luverne Characterized by One Continuous Round of Pleasure—Dancing, Card, Dinner, Birthday Parties, Etc.—Wedding next Wednesday
      The social record of the past week, which has maintained about the usual average in such matters, includes eleven parties of various kinds with at least three more to be added to the list before the week closes.
         One of the first and also one of the most unique and delightful affairs was the character card party given Friday night by Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Gerber at their beautiful home on West Main Street, to which the following invitation printed in flaring poster style had been issued:
         EXCURSION! The Go Slow and Never Arrive R. R. Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Gerber invite you to take a trip with them in their special car, Colonial, on Friday, January 27. Train leaves on the Progressive Clinch route promptly at 8 p.m., stopping 20 minutes for lunch, returning home at 12 o’clock. This is an emigrant train—dress accordingly. Please answer promptly so seats can be reserved for you.
         The emigrants “dressed accordingly” and their appearance caused endless amusement. On their arrival at the “depot” their baggage was checked and the passengers passed on to the waiting rooms on the second floor which had been appropriately fitted up and decorated for the purpose. Two adjoining parlors on the first floor, with tables designated by the names of towns, represented the cars, and after obtaining their tickets at the ingeniously improvised ticket office the “emigrants,” as the name of the town on their respective tickets was called, entered the “cars” and found their destinations. Refresh-ments were served at a lunch counter in the dining room in true, railroad lunch counter style, though it must be admitted that the lunch itself was far different.
***
         The “violet” luncheon” given at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Harroun by the Misses Ella Harroun and Alice Burleigh, with Miss Laura Hinkly the guest of honor, was a rarely pretty and pleasing event. As indicated by its name, violets and violet colors predominated everywhere. Covers were laid for eighteen and luncheon was served on small tables, which were fairly strewn with cut violets and held large center pieces of these flowers of “love and faithfulness,” happily symbolic of the approaching marriage of the guest of honor. In the room where the luncheon was served violet colored strands extended from the ceiling to the corner of the tables, joining them in a perfect mesh. The rooms were darkened and candles used for illumination, their soft light adding materially in the pleasing color effect.
***
         A delightful little dinner party with Mr. John M. Connell and Miss Laura Hinkly as guest of honor was one of the happy evens of last evening. The dinner was given by Mr. Wm. Jacobsen, Jr., at the home of his parents on North Estey street, and was commemorative of the approaching nuptials of the two popular young people who were the guests of honor. The house was tastefully arranged and the table beautifully decorated with white carnations and smilax, while bouquets of carnations were given as favors. The dinner was elaborate in all its appointments and as properly befitted an event of this character was a very happy one to the guests who included only the more intimate friends of the guests of honor. Covers were laid for twelve.
***
         The annual dance of the A. O. U. W. Lodge, the second event of its kind in the history of the local organization, was a pleasing success in every way and a credit not only to the organization but to the committee having the affair in charge. The company in attendance was very large, but the music of the Ainsworth orchestra, which is always in every sense perfect dance music, obviated much of the difficulty incident to the crowded condition of the dance hall. The Workman hall in the Drew block was used for the accommodation of the guests who preferred not to dance and at this place cards and other games were played. Supper was also served in this hall and the “spread” prepared was the most elaborate ever given by a local lodge.
         Donations to the Rock County Historical Society can be sent to the Rock County Historical Society, 312 E. Main Street, Luverne, MN 56156.
Mann welcomes correspondence sent to mannmade@iw.net.